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Lacto Fermented Garlic Dill Pickles

Pickles, Lacto Fermented Garlic Dill
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picklesSm

These are fermented but also call for some vinegar. They are crunchy and delicious with a tang that will wake up your mouth.

 

Grape leaves are optional but they have an ingredient (tannin) that will help keep the pickles crisp.

Servings Prep Time
1 quart 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
0 1 week
Servings Prep Time
1 quart 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
0 1 week
Pickles, Lacto Fermented Garlic Dill
Print Recipe
picklesSm

These are fermented but also call for some vinegar. They are crunchy and delicious with a tang that will wake up your mouth.

 

Grape leaves are optional but they have an ingredient (tannin) that will help keep the pickles crisp.

Servings Prep Time
1 quart 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
0 1 week
Servings Prep Time
1 quart 45 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
0 1 week
Ingredients
Main Ingredients
Brine Ingredients
Servings: quart
Instructions
  1. Wash the cucumbers, but don’t scrub them (you want to leave some lactobacillus bacteria on them) and rub off any spines.
  2. Trim about 1/8 inch off the blossom end of the cucumbers. This removes an enzyme that can make your pickles limp. I also cut the cucumbers into halves or quarters so they fit together better in the jar.
  3. Put the other Main Ingredients in a 1 quart largemouth canning jar and then pack cucumbers in as tightly as possible (try not to bruise them in the process).
  4. Mix the brine ingredients together in a bowl and then pour the mixture into the jar to cover the cucumbers completely, leaving about 1/2 inch headspace.
  5. Cover with a canning jar lid and band, write the date or day on the jar (a Sharpie works), place the jar in a bowl (to catch any overflow or leakage on the days the jar is inverted) and once a day, for a week, flip the jar over to redistribute the spices that will tend to settle to the bottom.
  6. After a week, keep the jar in the refrigerator. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

The original recipe said these would keep for a month in the refrigerator, but I have some that are several months old and they are just as crispy and delicious as they started out. Remember that with ANY fermented vegetables, if they look or smell bad or appear slimy, don’t eat them!

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Beef Stock

Beef Bone Broth / Stock
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For extra flavor, you can drizzle a little olive oil on the bones and roast them for about an hour at 400°F before making the stock. This step will add to your prep time...
Servings Prep Time
2+ quarts 1 hour
Cook Time Passive Time
48 hours 48 hours
Servings Prep Time
2+ quarts 1 hour
Cook Time Passive Time
48 hours 48 hours
Beef Bone Broth / Stock
Print Recipe
For extra flavor, you can drizzle a little olive oil on the bones and roast them for about an hour at 400°F before making the stock. This step will add to your prep time...
Servings Prep Time
2+ quarts 1 hour
Cook Time Passive Time
48 hours 48 hours
Servings Prep Time
2+ quarts 1 hour
Cook Time Passive Time
48 hours 48 hours
Ingredients
Servings: quarts
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients, except for parsley and salt & pepper, in a large stock pot.
  2. Heat to a light boil, then adjust the burner so the stock remains at a low simmer. Simmer for 48 hours or more, checking once in a while to make sure you're not losing water. Add more water if needed.
  3. Half an hour before the stock is done, add the parsley.
  4. Using a large slotted spoon, remove bones, meat and vegetables. Strain stock through a fine mesh sieve or cheese cloth if desired. Add salt & pepper.
  5. Let stock cool in refrigerator to solidify fat for removal. You can refrigerate the pot if you have room, or if you plan to freeze the stock, you can put the stock in jars and put them in the refrigerator.
  6. Remove fat from the top. Freeze jars or pressure can per your canner's instructions (this would entail reheating the stock).
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